Skip to content
SuperMoney logo
SuperMoney logo

5/6 Hybrid ARM: How It Works, Pros, and Real-Life Examples

Last updated 04/30/2024 by

Silas Bamigbola

Edited by

Fact checked by

Summary:
A 5/6 hybrid adjustable-rate mortgage (ARM) offers a fixed interest rate for the first five years and then adjusts every six months. This versatile mortgage combines the benefits of fixed and adjustable rates, providing borrowers with flexibility. In this article, we’ll delve into the details of how a 5/6 hybrid ARM works, its pros and cons, and why it might be the right choice for you.

Compare Home Loans

Compare rates from multiple vetted lenders. Discover your lowest eligible rate.
Compare Rates

Understanding the 5/6 hybrid adjustable-rate mortgage (ARM)

How a 5/6 hybrid adjustable-rate mortgage (ARM) works

A 5/6 hybrid ARM initiates with a fixed interest rate for the first five years, giving borrowers a sense of financial stability. After this initial period, the interest rate becomes adjustable for the remaining years of the loan. The adjustment is typically based on a benchmark index, often the prime rate.
In addition to the benchmark index, lenders apply a margin, which is an extra percentage added to the index rate. For instance, if the index stands at 4% and the lender’s margin is 3%, the borrower’s fully indexed interest rate would be 7%.
To protect borrowers from abrupt interest rate hikes, 5/6 hybrid ARMs typically come with caps that limit how much the interest rate can rise over the life of the loan. This safeguard ensures that monthly mortgage payments remain manageable even when rates increase.

How are 5/6 hybrid ARMs indexed?

Lenders use various indexes to determine interest rates for 5/6 hybrid ARMs. Commonly used indexes include the U.S. prime rate and the Constant Maturity Treasury (CMT) rate. In a rising interest-rate environment, the longer the period between interest-rate resets, the better it is for borrowers. For instance, a 5/1 hybrid ARM is more advantageous than a 5/6 ARM in such situations because it doesn’t experience interest rate hikes as quickly. The opposite is true in a falling interest-rate environment.

5/6 hybrid ARM vs. fixed-rate mortgage

Advantages of a 5/6 hybrid ARM

One of the primary advantages of 5/6 hybrid ARMs, like other adjustable-rate mortgages, is that they typically start with lower interest rates than fixed-rate mortgages. This provides borrowers with significant savings, especially if they plan to sell their home or refinance their mortgage before the fixed-rate period ends. However, borrowers should ensure there are no costly prepayment penalties for exiting the mortgage early.

Disadvantages of a 5/6 hybrid ARM

The main drawback of a 5/6 hybrid ARM is the risk associated with its adjustable interest rate. Since the interest rate can change every six months after the initial five-year fixed period, monthly payments might become unaffordable for some borrowers. In contrast, with a fixed-rate mortgage, the interest rate remains constant. To mitigate this interest rate risk, 5/6 hybrid ARMs often have periodic and lifetime caps that limit the extent to which interest rates can increase.

What is an adjustable-rate mortgage (ARM)?

How is the interest rate on a 5/6 ARM determined?

The interest rate on a 5/6 ARM is determined by the lender based on the borrower’s creditworthiness and prevailing interest rates. After the initial five-year fixed period, the rate is based on a benchmark index, such as the prime rate, with the addition of the lender’s margin.

Preventing interest rates from rising too high on a 5/6 ARM

Many 5/6 hybrid ARMs, like other types of ARMs, come with caps that set limits on how much interest rates can rise during any given period and over the loan’s lifetime.

Understanding the 5/6 hybrid adjustable-rate mortgage in real life

When considering a financial decision as significant as a mortgage, real-life examples can provide valuable insights. Let’s examine a practical scenario involving a 5/6 hybrid ARM:
Suppose Jane, a first-time homebuyer, is considering her mortgage options. She has found a house she loves and plans to stay in it for around seven years. Jane’s lender offers her a 5/6 hybrid ARM with an initial fixed rate of 3.5% for the first five years. After that, the rate can adjust every six months. The benchmark index used is the U.S. prime rate, which is currently at 4.25%, and the lender’s margin is 2.5%.
This means Jane’s fully indexed interest rate for the remaining years of the loan could potentially be as high as 6.75% (prime rate + margin). However, her 5/6 hybrid ARM has a cap that limits interest rate increases to 2% every six months and 6% over the life of the loan. Jane carefully considers her financial situation and decides that the lower initial rate of the 5/6 hybrid ARM aligns with her plans to sell the house before the fixed period ends. She secures her mortgage and enjoys lower monthly payments during her ownership.

5/6 hybrid ARM vs. other mortgage options

Comparing mortgage options is essential to making an informed choice. Let’s explore how the 5/6 hybrid ARM stacks up against other popular mortgage types:
1. Fixed-rate mortgage: A fixed-rate mortgage offers a stable interest rate for the entire loan term. While it provides consistent monthly payments, it typically starts with higher interest rates than ARMs like the 5/6 hybrid. This option is great for those who prioritize predictability but might not offer the initial cost savings of an ARM.
2. 5/1 hybrid ARM: The 5/1 hybrid ARM is similar to the 5/6 ARM but with a shorter initial fixed period of five years. It may be a better choice if you plan to sell or refinance your home within a shorter timeframe. The trade-off is that the rate can adjust more frequently, potentially leading to higher payments sooner.
3. Interest-only mortgage: Interest-only mortgages allow borrowers to pay only the interest for a specific period, often five to ten years, after which they start repaying both principal and interest. These mortgages can provide lower initial payments but come with the risk of a significant increase in monthly payments when the interest-only period ends.
4. FHA loan: Federal Housing Administration (FHA) loans are government-backed loans designed for first-time homebuyers with lower credit scores. They offer fixed and adjustable-rate options. While they can be easier to qualify for, they come with mortgage insurance requirements.
By comparing these mortgage options, you can better understand which one aligns with your financial goals and circumstances. It’s crucial to consider factors like your expected length of homeownership, risk tolerance, and current financial situation.

The bottom line

In summary, a 5/6 hybrid adjustable-rate mortgage offers borrowers a fixed interest rate for the first five years, followed by semi-annual adjustments. The interest rate is typically linked to a benchmark index, such as the prime rate, and often comes with protective caps. This mortgage option combines the stability of a fixed-rate mortgage with the potential for lower initial rates, making it an appealing choice for some homebuyers.

Frequently Asked Questions

What is the primary advantage of a 5/6 hybrid ARM over a fixed-rate mortgage?

One of the main advantages of a 5/6 hybrid ARM is that it often starts with lower interest rates compared to fixed-rate mortgages. This can result in significant savings for borrowers, particularly if they plan to sell their home or refinance before the fixed-rate period ends.

Are there any potential downsides to a 5/6 hybrid ARM?

Yes, there are potential downsides. The primary concern is the adjustable interest rate, which can change every six months after the initial five-year fixed period. This may lead to unaffordable monthly payments for some borrowers. To mitigate this risk, 5/6 hybrid ARMs typically have caps that limit the extent to which interest rates can increase.

How does the interest rate on a 5/6 ARM compare to a fixed-rate mortgage?

The interest rate on a 5/6 ARM initially tends to be lower than that of a fixed-rate mortgage. However, it’s essential to consider that this rate can adjust over time. Fixed-rate mortgages offer a stable interest rate throughout the loan term but typically start with higher initial rates.

What benchmarks are commonly used for indexing 5/6 hybrid ARMs?

Lenders often use benchmarks such as the U.S. prime rate and the Constant Maturity Treasury (CMT) rate to determine interest rates for 5/6 hybrid ARMs. The choice of benchmark can impact how quickly the interest rate adjusts in response to market changes.

Can you provide an example of how a 5/6 hybrid ARM works in practice?

Certainly. Let’s say a borrower chooses a 5/6 hybrid ARM with a five-year fixed rate of 3.5%. After the initial fixed period, the interest rate becomes adjustable and is based on the prime rate, which currently stands at 4.25%. With the lender’s margin of 2.5%, the fully indexed interest rate could reach 6.75%. However, caps on the ARM limit how much this rate can increase.

How do 5/6 hybrid ARMs compare to other types of adjustable-rate mortgages?

5/6 hybrid ARMs differ from other ARMs like the 5/1 hybrid ARM in terms of the initial fixed period. While a 5/6 ARM offers a fixed rate for the first five years, a 5/1 ARM has a shorter fixed period of one year. The choice between them depends on factors like your expected length of homeownership and your tolerance for potential rate adjustments.

Key takeaways

  • A 5/6 hybrid ARM combines a fixed interest rate for the first five years with adjustable rates afterward.
  • The interest rate on a 5/6 ARM is typically tied to a benchmark index and includes a lender’s margin.
  • Advantages of a 5/6 hybrid ARM include lower initial rates, while the primary disadvantage is the risk of rising rates.
  • Caps on 5/6 hybrid ARMs limit interest rate increases, ensuring manageable monthly payments.

SuperMoney may receive compensation from some or all of the companies featured, and the order of results are influenced by advertising bids, with exception for mortgage and home lending related products. Learn more

Loading results ...

You might also like