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How to Remove Accumed Collections From your Credit Report

Last updated 07/03/2024 by

Silas Bamigbola

Edited by

Fact checked by

Summary:
Accumed Collections is a debt collection agency that can negatively impact your credit score. This article covers who they collect for, how they operate, and how to handle their collection attempts. Learn how to potentially remove their marks from your credit report, understand your rights, and make informed decisions about dealing with them.
Accumed Collections is a debt collector that might appear on your credit report if they are attempting to collect a debt from you. This can be troubling, as a collections account can significantly hurt your credit score and your ability to secure loans or other financial opportunities. Understanding who Accumed Collections collects for, how they operate, and your rights can help you navigate interactions with them more effectively.

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Who does Accumed Collections collect for?

Accumed Collections typically collects debts on behalf of various creditors. These creditors can range from credit card companies to medical service providers. Here’s a breakdown of what this means for you:

Original creditors vs. debt purchases

  • Original creditors: Accumed Collections may be hired by the original creditor to collect on a debt you owe. This means the original creditor still owns the debt, but Accumed Collections is responsible for the collection process.
  • Debt purchases: In some cases, Accumed Collections may purchase the debt from the original creditor. They often buy these debts for pennies on the dollar, meaning they pay a fraction of the debt’s original value. Once they own the debt, they have the right to collect the full amount from you.

Types of debts collected

Accumed Collections can collect various types of debts, including:
  • Medical bills
  • Credit card debts
  • Personal loans
  • Utility bills

How does Accumed Collections affect my credit score?

A collection account from Accumed Collections can significantly impact your credit score. Here’s how:

Immediate impact

When a collections account is reported, it can drop your credit score by several points. The exact number can vary based on your overall credit profile, but it is generally a negative mark.

Long-term effects

Collections accounts can stay on your credit report for up to seven years from the date of the first delinquency. This long-lasting effect can make it difficult to get approved for new credit, secure favorable interest rates, or even rent an apartment.

Removing Accumed Collections from your credit report

Removing a collections account from your credit report can be challenging but not impossible. Here are some strategies to consider:

Disputing errors

According to studies, a significant percentage of credit reports contain errors. If there are inaccuracies in the collection account reported by Accumed Collections, you have the right to dispute them.
  • Check for errors: Review your credit report for any incorrect information such as the amount owed, dates, or even the identity of the debtor.
  • File a dispute: You can file a dispute with the credit bureaus to correct any inaccuracies. They are required to investigate and resolve disputes, usually within 30 days.

Validation request

You can request Accumed Collections to validate the debt. Under the Fair Debt Collection Practices Act (FDCPA), they must provide proof that the debt is yours and that they have the right to collect it.
  • Send a debt validation letter: This letter requests debt validation letter, including the amount owed and the original creditor’s information.
  • Wait for response: If Accumed Collections cannot provide adequate validation, they are required to cease collection activities and remove the collection from your credit report.

Negotiating a pay-for-delete agreement

A pay-for-delete agreement involves paying the debt in exchange for Accumed Collections removing the account from your credit report. This is not guaranteed and can be difficult to negotiate, but it’s worth trying.
  • Contact Accumed Collections: Offer to pay the full amount or a settled amount if they agree to remove the account from your credit report.
  • Get it in writing: Ensure any agreement is documented in writing before making any payments.

Pro Tip

Before negotiating a pay-for-delete agreement, research your rights and be prepared to present your case clearly. This can increase your chances of success.

Rights when dealing with Accumed Collections

You have several rights under federal laws when dealing with debt collectors like Accumed Collections. Knowing these rights can help you protect yourself.

Fair Debt Collection Practices Act (FDCPA)

The FDCPA prohibits debt collectors from using abusive, unfair, or deceptive practices to collect debts. Key protections include:
  • Harassment: Debt collectors cannot harass or abuse you, which includes excessive phone calls or threats.
  • Validation of debt: You have the right to request validation of the debt within 30 days of the first contact.
  • Communication: Debt collectors must respect your request to stop communication or to only communicate through a lawyer.

Fair Credit Reporting Act (FCRA)

The FCRA ensures the accuracy, fairness, and privacy of information in the files of consumer reporting agencies. Key points include:
  • Dispute rights: You can dispute incorrect information on your credit report.
  • Access to information: You have the right to know what is in your credit report.

Pro Tip

Keep detailed records of all communications with debt collectors. This can be useful if you need to dispute their actions or provide evidence of harassment.

Request all correspondence in writing

Ensure a documented record of communications with Accumed Collections by requesting written correspondence. Contact Accumed Collections at the following address:
Accumed Collections contact information
16727 Park Row, Houston, TX 77084, USA
Ph# 888-282-0553

How to file a complaint against Accumed Collections

If you believe that Accumed Collections has violated your rights or used unfair practices, you can file a complaint against them. Here’s how:
  • Contact the Consumer Financial Protection Bureau (CFPB): You can file a complaint online at the CFPB’s website or call their helpline.
  • Contact the Federal Trade Commission (FTC): The FTC handles complaints about deceptive business practices, including those by debt collectors. You can file a complaint online at the FTC’s website or call their helpline.
  • Contact your State Attorney General’s Office: Many states have their own consumer protection agencies that can assist with complaints. You can find contact information for your State Attorney General’s Office on their official website.

Understanding your rights under FDCPA and FCRA

It’s crucial to understand your rights under the Fair Debt Collection Practices Act (FDCPA) and the Fair Credit Reporting Act (FCRA). These laws protect you from abusive practices and ensure the accuracy of your credit report. Here are some key points:
  • FDCPA: Prohibits debt collectors from using abusive, unfair, or deceptive practices. You can request validation of the debt, and collectors must stop communication if you request it in writing.
  • FCRA: Ensures that credit reporting agencies provide accurate information. You can dispute incorrect or incomplete information on your credit report, and the agency must investigate.

Pro Tip

Before paying off a collection, consider negotiating a pay-for-delete agreement, but ensure you get the agreement in writing before making any payment.

Accumed Collections’ impact on your financial health

Accumed Collections can significantly impact your financial health and credit score. Understanding who they are, how they operate, and your rights can help you manage their collection attempts more effectively. Whether you choose to dispute the debt, negotiate a settlement, or seek professional help, being informed and proactive is crucial. Always keep detailed records of all communications and know your rights under the FDCPA and FCRA to protect yourself from unfair practices.

Frequently asked questions

What is Accumed Collections?

Accumed Collections is a debt collection agency that purchases overdue debts from original creditors and attempts to collect these debts from consumers. They may appear on your credit report if you have an unpaid debt that has been sold to them.

How does Accumed Collections affect my credit score?

Having Accumed Collections listed on your credit report can significantly lower your credit score. Collections accounts are considered negative marks and can remain on your report for up to seven years from the date of the first delinquency.

How can I remove Accumed Collections from my credit report?

You can remove Accumed Collections from your credit report by disputing any errors, requesting debt validation, or negotiating a pay-for-delete agreement. It’s important to ensure that any agreement is documented in writing before making any payments.

Is Accumed Collections a legitimate company?

Yes, Accumed Collections is a legitimate debt collection agency. They are not a scam, but they may use persistent and aggressive tactics to collect debts. It’s important to know your rights under the Fair Debt Collection Practices Act (FDCPA) when dealing with them.

What should I do if Accumed Collections keeps calling me?

If Accumed Collections keeps calling you, you can request that they communicate with you in writing only. Document all communications and consider seeking assistance from a credit repair professional if the calls continue or if you need help managing the debt.

Key takeaways

  • Accumed Collections is a legitimate debt collection agency that can impact your credit score.
  • You have rights under the FDCPA and FCRA when dealing with debt collectors.
  • Disputing errors and requesting debt validation are crucial steps in managing collections.
  • Negotiating a pay-for-delete agreement or settlement can potentially improve your credit situation.
  • Always document all communications with Accumed Collections.

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