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How to Remove Action Revenue Recovery From your Credit Report

Last updated 07/03/2024 by

Silas Bamigbola

Edited by

Fact checked by

Summary:
Action Revenue Recovery is a debt collection agency that may appear on your credit report, negatively impacting your credit score. This article explores who they collect for, how to deal with them, and various strategies for removing their mark from your credit report.
Action Revenue Recovery, LLC is a name that might cause concern if it appears on your credit report. This debt collection agency could be attempting to recover funds on behalf of a creditor or may have purchased your debt at a discounted rate. In this comprehensive guide, we’ll cover everything you need to know about Action Revenue Recovery, including how it affects your credit score and steps you can take to address it.

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Who does Action Revenue Recovery collect for?

Action Revenue Recovery collects debts on behalf of various creditors. These creditors could be credit card companies, loan providers, or other financial institutions that have decided to outsource their debt collection efforts. In some cases, Action Revenue Recovery might purchase debt portfolios for a fraction of their value and attempt to collect the full amount from consumers.

Types of debts collected

The types of debts Action Revenue Recovery might collect include:
  • Credit card debts
  • Personal loans
  • Medical bills
  • Utility bills
  • Telecommunication bills

Does Action Revenue Recovery hurt my credit score?

Any derogatory mark on your credit report, including a collections account from Action Revenue Recovery, can severely impact your credit score. This negative mark can lower your score and reduce your chances of obtaining loans, credit cards, or favorable interest rates.

Impact on credit score

The presence of a collections account can drop your credit score significantly. The extent of the impact depends on various factors, such as the amount of debt, the length of time the account has been in collections, and your overall credit history.

How to remove Action Revenue Recovery from your credit report

Removing Action Revenue Recovery from your credit report can be challenging, but it’s not impossible. Here are some steps you can take:

Check for errors

Review your credit report for any inaccuracies. If you find any incorrect information, dispute it with the credit bureaus. According to a study by the U.S. Public Interest Research Group (PIRG), 79% of credit reports contain mistakes or serious errors.

Request validation

Within 30 days of being contacted by Action Revenue Recovery, request a debt validation letter. This will require them to provide proof that the debt is yours and that they have the right to collect it.

Negotiate a settlement

If the debt is valid, consider negotiating a settlement. You can ask for a “pay-for-delete” agreement, where you agree to pay a portion of the debt in exchange for the removal of the account from your credit report. However, keep in mind that not all collection agencies will agree to this.

Pro tip

Always get any agreement with a debt collector in writing before making a payment.

Seek professional help

If you’re unsure how to proceed, consider consulting a credit repair professional who can help you navigate the process and potentially remove negative items from your credit report.

Request all correspondence in writing

Ensure a documented record of communications with Action Revenue Recovery by requesting written correspondence. This not only provides a paper trail but also helps protect your rights under the Fair Debt Collection Practices Act (FDCPA). Contact Action Revenue Recovery at the following address:
Action Revenue Recovery contact information
910 Bres Ave., Monroe, LA 71201
+1 (318) 387-9002
info@actionrevenue.com
Requesting all correspondence in writing is a crucial step to ensure you have documented proof of all interactions, which can be beneficial if disputes arise or if you need to challenge the debt.

How to file a complaint against them

If you believe that Action Revenue Recovery has violated your rights or engaged in unfair practices, you have the right to file a complaint. Here are the steps you can take:

File a complaint with the Consumer Financial Protection Bureau (CFPB)

The CFPB is a federal agency that oversees the practices of financial companies, including debt collectors. You can file a complaint with the CFPB online:
CFPB Complaint Portal
Submit a complaint online

Report to the Better Business Bureau (BBB)

The BBB collects and publishes complaints about businesses, helping consumers make informed decisions. You can file a complaint with the BBB online:
BBB Complaint Portal
Submit a complaint online

Contact your state Attorney General’s office

Your state Attorney General’s office can take action against companies that violate state laws regarding debt collection. Find your state Attorney General’s contact information online.
Filing a complaint helps ensure that your rights are protected and can lead to investigations into the practices of debt collectors like Action Revenue Recovery.

Understanding your rights under the FDCPA

The Fair Debt Collection Practices Act (FDCPA) provides consumers with protections against abusive debt collection practices. Knowing your rights can help you handle interactions with Action Revenue Recovery more effectively. Key protections include:
  • Debt collectors must send a written notice of the debt within five days of their initial contact.
  • You have the right to dispute the debt within 30 days of receiving the notice.
  • Debt collectors cannot call you at inconvenient times or places, such as before 8 a.m. or after 9 p.m.
  • They are prohibited from using abusive, unfair, or deceptive practices to collect a debt.
Understanding these rights can empower you to respond appropriately to debt collection efforts and protect yourself from potential abuses.

How to dispute a debt with Action Revenue Recovery

If you believe the debt Action Revenue Recovery is attempting to collect is not yours, or if you find errors in the reported amount, you have the right to dispute the debt. Here’s how:
  1. Send a written dispute letter to Action Revenue Recovery within 30 days of their initial contact.
  2. Include copies of any evidence that supports your dispute (e.g., payment records, correspondence).
  3. Request that Action Revenue Recovery provides verification of the debt in question.
Once your dispute is received, Action Revenue Recovery must cease collection efforts until they can provide verification of the debt.

Steps to take if you’re being sued by Action Revenue Recovery

Although it’s uncommon, Action Revenue Recovery might take legal action to collect a debt. If you receive a summons, here are the steps you should take:
  1. Do not ignore the summons: Respond promptly to avoid a default judgment.
  2. Seek legal advice: Consult with an attorney who specializes in debt collection cases.
  3. Prepare your defense: Gather any documentation that supports your case, such as payment records or dispute letters.
Handling the situation proactively can improve your chances of a favorable outcome and protect your financial interests.

Frequently asked questions

Is Action Revenue Recovery legitimate?

Yes, Action Revenue Recovery is a legitimate debt collection agency. They are not a scam, but their collection practices can sometimes be aggressive.

Why does Action Revenue Recovery keep calling me?

If Action Revenue Recovery is contacting you, it means they are attempting to collect a debt. It’s essential to handle these calls professionally and understand your rights under the Fair Debt Collection Practices Act (FDCPA).

Can Action Revenue Recovery garnish my wages?

In some cases, Action Revenue Recovery may pursue legal action to garnish wages. However, this is relatively rare and usually happens only if other collection efforts have failed.

How do I dispute a debt with Action Revenue Recovery?

If you believe the debt Action Revenue Recovery is attempting to collect is not yours, or if you find errors in the reported amount, you have the right to dispute the debt. Send a written dispute letter to Action Revenue Recovery within 30 days of their initial contact, include copies of any evidence that supports your dispute, and request verification of the debt.

What are my rights when dealing with Action Revenue Recovery?

You have the right to dispute any debt Action Revenue Recovery is trying to collect. They are governed by the Fair Debt Collection Practices Act (FDCPA) and the Fair Credit Reporting Act (FCRA), which provide protections against abusive, unfair, or deceptive practices by debt collectors.

Key takeaways

  • Action Revenue Recovery is a legitimate debt collection agency.
  • A collections account can severely impact your credit score.
  • There are steps you can take to remove Action Revenue Recovery from your credit report.
  • Consider seeking professional help if you’re unsure how to proceed.

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