Skip to content
SuperMoney logo
SuperMoney logo

Asset Turnover Ratio Definition

Last updated 03/28/2024 by

SuperMoney Team

Edited by

Fact checked by

Summary:
The asset turnover ratio is a financial metric used to measure a company’s efficiency in generating revenue from its assets. It measures how efficiently a company uses its assets to generate sales, indicating its ability to convert its assets into revenue.

What is asset turnover ratio?

The asset turnover ratio is a financial metric used to assess a company’s efficiency in using its assets to generate sales. It measures the amount of revenue a company generates per dollar of assets it holds. In simpler terms, it is a ratio of a company’s sales to the value of its assets.

Formula and calculation

The formula to calculate the asset turnover ratio is as follows:
Asset Turnover Ratio = Revenue / Average Total Assets
To calculate the average total assets, add the beginning and ending assets for a given period and divide the sum by two. The resulting ratio will provide insights into how efficiently a company is using its assets to generate sales.

What it can tell you

The asset turnover ratio provides insights into a company’s operational efficiency and can be used to compare it with other companies in the same industry. A high asset turnover ratio indicates that a company is using its assets efficiently to generate revenue, while a low ratio suggests that a company may have issues with its asset management or inefficient use of assets.

Example

Suppose Company ABC generated $1,000,000 in sales over a year, and its average total assets were $500,000.
Using the formula mentioned above, the asset turnover ratio for Company ABC would be calculated as:
Asset Turnover Ratio = $1,000,000 / $500,000 = 2
This means that Company ABC generated $2 in revenue for every dollar of assets it held.

DuPont analysis

The asset turnover ratio is a crucial component of the DuPont analysis, which is used to evaluate a company’s return on equity. The DuPont analysis breaks down the return on equity into three components: net profit margin, asset turnover ratio, and financial leverage.

Asset vs. fixed asset turnover

The asset turnover ratio is different from the fixed asset turnover ratio, which only takes into account the value of fixed assets, such as property, plant, and equipment, in the calculation. The fixed asset turnover ratio is useful in evaluating the efficiency of a company’s long-term investments in its assets.

Limitations

While the asset turnover ratio is an essential metric, it does have limitations.
For example:
  • It does not provide insights into the profitability of a company.
  • It does not consider the depreciation of assets over time.

Asset turnover FAQs

What is a good asset turnover ratio?

The ideal asset turnover ratio varies by industry, but generally, a higher ratio is better as it indicates a company is using its assets more efficiently to generate sales.

What is the difference between the asset turnover ratio and the inventory turnover ratio?

The asset turnover ratio takes into account all of a company’s assets, while the inventory turnover ratio only looks at how quickly a company is selling its inventory.

How can a company improve its asset turnover ratio?

Companies can improve their asset turnover ratio by increasing their sales while keeping their assets at the same level or by reducing their assets while maintaining their sales levels.

Key takeaways

  • The asset turnover ratio is a financial metric used to measure how efficiently a company uses its assets to generate sales.
  • The formula to calculate the asset turnover ratio is Revenue / Average Total Assets, which shows how much revenue a company generates per dollar of assets it holds.
  • A high asset turnover ratio indicates that a company is using its assets efficiently to generate revenue, while a low ratio suggests issues with asset management or inefficient use of assets. The ratio can be used to evaluate a company’s operational efficiency and compare it with other companies in the same industry.

You might also like