Skip to content
SuperMoney logo
SuperMoney logo

How to Remove National Credit Services from Your Credit Report

Last updated 06/30/2024 by

Bamigbola Paul

Edited by

Fact checked by

Summary:
National Credit Services, Inc. (NCS) is a prominent debt collection agency that may appear on your credit report. This article explores who they collect for, how they impact your credit score, and the steps you can take to manage or remove their entries from your report.
Dealing with debt collectors like National Credit Services can be stressful and confusing. Understanding your rights and options is crucial to managing your credit health effectively.

Get Competing Personal Loan Offers In Minutes

Compare rates from multiple vetted lenders. Discover your lowest eligible rate.
Get Personalized Rates
It's quick, free and won’t hurt your credit score

Who does National Credit Services collect for?

National Credit Services, Inc. (NCS) is a debt collection agency that works with a variety of creditors. These creditors often include credit card companies, loan providers, and other financial institutions that have sold or transferred delinquent accounts to NCS. NCS aims to recover the owed amount through persistent collection efforts.

Understanding debt collection practices

Debt collection agencies like NCS employ several methods to contact debtors, including phone calls, letters, and emails. Their goal is to recover as much of the outstanding debt as possible, either by negotiating a payment plan or receiving a lump sum payment. It is important to understand that these agencies are governed by federal laws, such as the Fair Debt Collection Practices Act (FDCPA), which sets guidelines for ethical debt collection practices.

Pro Tip

Always request a debt validation letter from National Credit Services. This letter should detail the debt they claim you owe and provide evidence that the debt is valid.

Does National Credit Services hurt my credit score?

Having a collections account from NCS on your credit report can significantly impact your credit score. Collections accounts are considered derogatory marks and can remain on your credit report for up to seven years from the date of the first delinquency. This can lower your credit score and affect your ability to obtain new credit, secure favorable interest rates, or even get approved for rental housing.

Impact on credit score

The presence of a collections account indicates to potential lenders that you have had trouble managing credit in the past. This can result in higher interest rates, lower credit limits, or outright denial of credit applications. Regularly monitoring your credit report and addressing any collections accounts promptly is essential to maintaining good credit health.

How do I remove National Credit Services from my credit report?

Removing a collections account from your credit report can be challenging but not impossible. Here are some steps you can take:

Check for errors

Review the details of the collections account to ensure all information is accurate. If there are any inaccuracies, you can dispute the account with the credit bureaus. According to a study by the U.S. Public Interest Research Group (U.S. PIRG), 79% of credit reports contain mistakes or serious errors. Identifying and disputing these errors can help improve your credit report.

Negotiate with NCS

If the debt is valid, you might consider negotiating a settlement with NCS. While this may not remove the account from your report entirely, settling the debt can change its status to ‘paid,’ which is less damaging than an unpaid debt.

Pay-for-delete agreement

In some cases, you might be able to negotiate a pay-for-delete agreement, where NCS agrees to remove the account from your credit report in exchange for payment. However, this practice is not always successful, and not all collection agencies will agree to such terms.

Pro Tip

Keep all communication with National Credit Services in writing. This provides you with a paper trail that can be useful if you need to dispute the debt or prove your actions later on.

Need help with National Credit Services?

If you are struggling to deal with NCS, consider seeking assistance from a credit repair company or a credit counseling service. These professionals can help you understand your options and take the necessary steps to improve your credit situation. They can also negotiate with collection agencies on your behalf and provide you with strategies to manage your debts more effectively.

When to seek professional help

Consider reaching out to a credit repair company if:
  • You are overwhelmed by multiple collections accounts.
  • You do not understand the debt validation process.
  • You need assistance disputing inaccuracies on your credit report.
  • You want to explore pay-for-delete or settlement options with professional support.

Pro Tip

Familiarize yourself with the FDCPA. Knowing your rights can empower you to handle debt collectors confidently and avoid falling victim to unfair practices.

Why does National Credit Services keep calling me?

National Credit Services may continue to call you if they are attempting to collect a debt. These calls can be persistent and, at times, overwhelming. If you are receiving frequent calls from NCS, consider the following steps:

Verify the debt

Request a debt validation letter to confirm that the debt is legitimate and that NCS has the right to collect it. This letter should provide details about the debt, including the original creditor and the amount owed.

Send a cease and desist letter

If the calls become too frequent or harassing, you can send a cease and desist letter to NCS, requesting that they stop contacting you. This does not eliminate the debt but can provide you with some relief from constant calls.

Does National Credit Services accept a goodwill letter to remove my collection/charge-off?

Typically, National Credit Services does not accept goodwill letters to remove collections or charge-offs. A goodwill letter is a request to the creditor or collection agency to remove a negative entry from your credit report out of goodwill, often due to extenuating circumstances. Most collection agencies, including NCS, are unlikely to honor such requests.

Alternatives to goodwill letters

Instead of relying on goodwill letters, focus on disputing inaccuracies, negotiating settlements, or seeking professional help to address collections accounts. These methods are often more effective in improving your credit report.

Request all correspondence in writing

Ensure a documented record of communications with National Credit Services by requesting written correspondence. This can help you keep track of all interactions and provide evidence in case of disputes. Contact National Credit Services at the following address:
National Credit Services contact information
2525 220th St SE, Suite 200, Bothell, WA 98021
PO Box 580 Bothell, WA 98041-0580
Ph# +1 888-768-1145

How to file a complaint against them

If you believe National Credit Services has violated your rights or engaged in unfair practices, you can file a complaint against them. There are several ways to do this:
  • Consumer Financial Protection Bureau (CFPB): Visit the CFPB website and submit a complaint online.
  • Federal Trade Commission (FTC): File a complaint through the FTC’s online complaint assistant.
  • State Attorney General’s Office: Contact your state Attorney General’s office to report any misconduct.
Filing a complaint can initiate an investigation and help protect other consumers from unfair practices.

Understand your debt validation rights

Under the Fair Debt Collection Practices Act (FDCPA), you have the right to request validation of any debt a collector claims you owe. This process requires National Credit Services to provide detailed information about the debt, including the original creditor and the amount owed. Knowing your validation rights can help you challenge invalid debts and protect your credit score.

Steps to negotiate a debt settlement

Negotiating a debt settlement with National Credit Services can be a strategic way to manage your outstanding debts. Here are some steps to consider:
  • Assess your financial situation: Determine how much you can afford to pay as a lump sum or in installments.
  • Initiate contact: Reach out to NCS and express your interest in negotiating a settlement.
  • Get everything in writing: Ensure that any agreement is documented to avoid future disputes.
Successful negotiation can lead to a reduced payment amount and help you resolve your debt more efficiently.

Know your rights during debt collection

Familiarizing yourself with your rights under the Fair Debt Collection Practices Act (FDCPA) can help you handle interactions with National Credit Services more confidently. Key rights include:
  • Right to dispute: You can dispute any debt you believe is incorrect or invalid.
  • Protection from harassment: Debt collectors cannot use abusive or threatening language.
  • Control over contact methods: You can request that collectors contact you only in certain ways or at specific times.
Understanding these rights can empower you to manage your debt collection process more effectively.

Conclusion

Dealing with National Credit Services can be challenging, but understanding your rights and options is essential to managing your credit health. Whether you choose to dispute inaccuracies, negotiate settlements, or seek professional help, taking proactive steps can help you address collections accounts and improve your credit score.

Frequently asked questions

What is National Credit Services?

National Credit Services, Inc. (NCS) is a debt collection agency that works with various creditors to recover outstanding debts. They may contact you if they have acquired your debt from the original creditor.

How can I contact National Credit Services?

You can contact National Credit Services via mail at 2525 220th St SE, Suite 200, Bothell, WA 98021, or by phone at +1 888-768-1145.

Can National Credit Services remove a collection from my credit report?

Yes, it is possible to have a collection removed from your credit report if you negotiate a pay-for-delete agreement or if you successfully dispute inaccuracies in the debt information provided.

How long does a collection account stay on my credit report?

A collection account can remain on your credit report for up to seven years from the date of the first delinquency. This period applies whether the debt is paid or unpaid.

What are my rights when dealing with National Credit Services?

Under the Fair Debt Collection Practices Act (FDCPA), you have the right to dispute the debt, request validation, and be free from harassment. You can also control how and when you are contacted by the debt collector.

What should I do if National Credit Services contacts me?

If National Credit Services contacts you, you should request a debt validation letter to ensure the debt is legitimate. If you believe the debt is incorrect, you have the right to dispute it.

How can I remove errors from my credit report?

You can dispute errors on your credit report by contacting the credit bureaus directly. Provide evidence to support your claim, and the credit bureaus will investigate and correct any inaccuracies.

Should I pay off my debt with National Credit Services?

Paying off your debt can change the status of the debt on your credit report from unpaid to paid, but the collection account will still remain for seven years. Consider negotiating a settlement or pay-for-delete agreement.

How do I file a complaint against National Credit Services?

You can file a complaint against National Credit Services with the Consumer Financial Protection Bureau (CFPB), the Federal Trade Commission (FTC), or your state Attorney General’s office if you believe your rights have been violated.

Key takeaways

  • National Credit Services, Inc. (NCS) is a legitimate debt collection agency that works with various creditors to recover outstanding debts.
  • Having a collections account from NCS on your credit report can significantly impact your credit score for up to seven years.
  • You have the right to dispute any inaccuracies in your debt information and request validation of the debt.
  • Negotiating a pay-for-delete agreement or settling the debt can potentially improve your credit report status.
  • Always request all communications with NCS in writing to keep a documented record of interactions.
  • If you believe your rights have been violated, you can file a complaint with the CFPB, FTC, or your state Attorney General’s office.
  • Seek professional help from credit repair companies or credit counseling services if you are overwhelmed by collections accounts.

SuperMoney may receive compensation from some or all of the companies featured, and the order of results are influenced by advertising bids, with exception for mortgage and home lending related products. Learn more

Loading results ...

Share this post:

You might also like